Julia Serano

YOU STUPID FEMALES KEEP WASTING MY TIME WITH YOUR VAGINAS!!!

SHOUT OUT TO PRETENDBIANS AT 1:10!!

So much frustration!

9 responses to “Julia Serano

  1. Sleeping with females that inject testosterone doesn’t make you bisexual.

  2. I hadn’t really thought a lot about it before, but now that I’ve read your blog, I’m convinced. You’re right; all “trans” people are evil, without a shred of redeeming virtue. Thanks for providing this public service.

    ED. NOTE – WE GET IT, YOU ARE BEING SARCASTIC. SO ARE WE! WE DON’T THINK TRANS PEOPLE ARE EVIL. WE DON’T EVEN THINK THE PEOPLE ON THIS BLOG ARE EVIL. WE THINK THESE SPECIFIC PEOPLE ARE MISGUIDED AND SAY THINGS THAT ARE HARMFUL TO FEMALES AND LESBIANS IN PARTICULAR.

    FROM DICKIPEDIA: Parody is a frequent ingredient in satire and is often used to make social and political points. Examples include Swift’s “A Modest Proposal”, which satirized English neglect of Ireland by parodying emotionally disengaged political tracts; and, recently, The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, which parody a news broadcast and a talk show to satirize political and social trends and events. Some events, such as a national tragedy, can be difficult to handle. Chet Clem, Editorial Manager of the news parody publication The Onion, told Wikinews in an interview the questions that are raised when addressing difficult topics:

    “I know the September 11 issue was an obviously very large challenge to approach. Do we even put out an issue? What is funny at this time in American history? Where are the jokes? Do people want jokes right now? Is the nation ready to laugh again? Who knows. There will always be some level of division in the back room. It’s also what keeps us on our toes.”

    Parody is by no means necessarily satirical, and may sometimes be done with respect and appreciation of the subject involved, while not being a heedless sarcastic attack.

    Parody has also been used to facilitate dialogue between cultures or subcultures. Sociolinguist Mary Louise Pratt identifies parody as one of the “arts of the contact zone”, through which marginalized or oppressed groups “selectively appropriate”, or imitate and take over, aspects of more empowered cultures.

    Shakespeare often uses a series of parodies to convey his meaning. In the social context of his era, an example can be seen in King Lear where the fool is introduced with his coxcomb to be a parody of the king.

  3. Pingback: Shout Out from Julia Serano! « Pretendbians: Exactly Like Lesbians, Except Not

  4. Silly women…. It’s only fun and funny when trans and drag queens parody women.